The Mysterious William Ralston of Greensburg, Westmoreland County, PA (1750 ish to aft. 1801)

William Ralston (born about 1750) settled in Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania in April, 1769 according to the testimony he gave to the court. This testimony can be found in the Pennsylvania, Published Archives Series, 1664-1902, 6th series, Volume XIII, Part Two on pages 31 and 32 and of which you can read below. This is also available in full on Ancestry.com.

In February of 1786, William tells the court that he claimed land north of Big Sewickley Creek, next to the lands of Jeremiah Lochrey and John Hughes in April/May of 1769. This is the exact time when this area of Pennsylvania was opened to legal settlement by the white people.  He loses this land during the American Revolution, and the US government pays him 646 pounds on March 17, 1782 as a result of the confiscation of his estate. You can see these documents in the same 6th series, Volume XII, pages 578 and 845.q

It is important to note the mention of Jeremiah Lochrey. This connects our William to Lochrey and we can then assume with a good deal of certainty that the William Ralston in the Pennsylvania Volunteers in the company commanded by Captain Jeremiah Lochrey, stationed in Westmoreland County, for the defense of the the frontiers is our William.

William Ralston was a sergeant in this company from April 11 to October 10, 1780 and then promoted to Ensign from October 11 to December 15, 1780. He is not listed as being specifically in the company of Rangers who were under Captain William Guthrie’s Company which served under the command of Captain Lochrey. But the term “ranger” was used for the soldiers who defended the American frontier at the time of the revolution from the American Indians working in conjunction with the British.

Here is a fabulous map of Pennsylvania in 1770. If you download it you can zoom in and see all of the marked areas.

1777fadenatlaspa

What else can we deduce with some certainty about this William Ralston?

He is not the William Ralston in East Caln, Chester County nor is William of East Caln, born about 1733, the father of my William. William of East Caln is the third son of John Ralston out of Pikeland and then Vincent, Chester County. John Sr. begins to own property in Chester County in the 1730s. William remained in East Caln, Chester County until he removed to Philadelphia and died there 18 Nov 1808 at the age of 75. Our William was in Westmoreland County with certainty. So the William Ralston in East Caln on the 1751, 1754, and 1786 census (and others) is another man. William Ralston also owned land in West Nantmeal and lists this as his residence when he purchases additional land in East Caln in 1756. See Book T-4, Page 629, Deeds of Chester County. He sold his property in East Caln to Joshua Way in 1801 Deeds Book W-2, Page 48 and he lists himself as being of Philadelphia at the time.

John Ralston Sr. came from Northern Ireland with his son Robert in 1728 and they settled in Pikeland, Chester County. Robert’s son John born in Vincent, Cester Co in 1744 and died in West Vincent in 1825. There is an entire article about these semi-famous and important Ralstons in the book Old Families of Philadelphia. Robert was an important man in the American Revolution and the listings of these Ralston men out of the Philadelphia militia in the Pennsylvania Published Archive Series are not my Ralstons, the Robert and William who lived in Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania. William Ralston of East Caln, Chester County had only one child, Robert, born 18 DEC 1761 in East Caln, Chester County, Pennsylvania. This Robert resided in Philadelphia by 1780 and is the reason William moved there. Same names and approximately the same ages, different family.

My William was on Forbes Road in Hempfield Township, Bedford County, PA in 1773, an area that became part of Westmoreland County.  Pennsylvania Tax and Exoneration List:

 

WmRalston1773HempfieldTownship

He lived in or very near to the historic Old Hanna’s Town.

In 1776, his son Jon was born near Greensburg, Westmoreland County, also very near to Hanna’s Town. We know this from the book titled Butler County (PA) History.

In 1774, William’s brother Robert signs a petition of Westmoreland County at Fort Shippen. You can see this in Pennsylvania Published Archives Series 1, Volume 4, 534.

RobertRalstonSignsPetition1774

 

You can read more about Fort Shippen and other western frontier forts and places here.

Let’s stop here at 1776 and with William’s American Revolution service and continue next time. I have the archives to continue perusing and also Westmoreland land deeds and surveys to look up and download. We have a court proceeding to find also for William lost his land in a court proceeding in the 1790s. A court proceeding that arose due to an event during the Revolution, separate from the confiscation noted above. The Ralstons were Scots-Irish presbyterians so maybe we can find some church proceeding records on them also.

Once we find everything we can readily find on William and Robert (and I have Robert’s will) we will try and see if we can deduce from whence they came to Westmoreland County and to where William went, along with wives and children.

Make note please of the proximity of the Hanna family in Westmoreland County as DNA results show a common ancestor 12 generations back from me. Or a few more generations back from William.

William ~ John Sr ~ John Jr ~ Millen ~ William A ~ Ivan ~ Richard ~ Me.

But more on this as I cannot locate a birth record for Ivan, though he was born in 1902 when they were required at the county level in Iowa. Orphan Train baby?

 

The Conundrum of NPEs in Genealogical DNA Testing and the Ralston Family

I am finally finding some time to dig into my Ralston line. I was prompted to do this as my sibling’s DNA test is showing a possible Non-Paternal Event.

This means that somewhere on the male Ralston Y-DNA line, there was (possibly) an event in a family’s life in which they gave one of my ancestors the last name of Ralston, or he took on the surname himself, but his biological father was not a biological Ralston.

There are a lot of armchair DNA genealogists these days, running their little surname projects and asking everyone with the same surname to join the project and get tested. One of them did this to me and then wasn’t so nice about our results. Told me to stop saying my Ralstons were Scottish (not that I have), that I wasn’t a “real Ralston.” That my family tree was very problematic. See, he didn’t use the family tree I provided to the project but the one I was working on on Ancestry. And I don’t claim anything for sure without historical documents and references. If you haven’t noticed yet, most of the trees on Ancestry are cobbled together without fact-checking or sources. People don’t realize there were three Benjamin Ellisons all born within a year or so of each other and all born in Yorkshire (but in different towns or villages), for example, and they cannot possibly all have the same father. You have to do the work to sort these men out before you lay claim to one as yours.

BTW: I did figure out my Benjamin Ellison and was able to take his line back to the 1600s.

But the thing about Ancestry search is that the more you add to your tree, the better your search results. To combat this, I’ve taken to creating new trees with people I suspect might be my ancestors. Then I work through this tree, using ancestry, familysearch.org, archives, libraries, other source material. And when I can connect for sure with other people in another tree, I do so.

Couple of other problems with the armchair DNA genealogist’s claims. First, Y-DNA only tests the male line. So here is a very real scenario. One of my Ralston ancestors’ mother was a Ralston and she gave birth out of wedlock to him. I say this because on my maternal side, my fifth great-grandparents had a son out of wedlock and he was baptized under his mother’s maiden name and then a year later, his mother married his father. The baptismal record lists his father’s legal name. This child went the rest of his life using the name on his baptismal record, never using his father’s surname.

I could indeed be a real Ralston. Our maternal ancestry makes us just as much of who we are as our paternal does. Also, if our family has gone by the Ralston surname now since the early 1700s, I think we can say we are real Ralstons. Adopted doesn’t make someone any less part of the family.

Second, the Ralstons were Scots-Irish Americans, or Ulster Scots, in the mid 1700s in Pennsylvania as is the family our DNA seems to be matching up with. Ulster Scots were from Scotland but some of them immigrated to Northern Ireland in the 1600s to help Mary Queen of Scots’s, the Roman Catholic queen who came to an awful end, Protestant son, King James I, populate Ireland with Protestants. Beginning in the early 1700s this wasn’t working out so well for these predominantly tenant farmers and they began migrating to colonial America. Land for the taking (or so they thought). They weren’t Irish in their ethnicity/heritage; they were Scottish. Most of them anyway. One hundred years is a long time to live in Northern Ireland and they intermarried and so forth. But basically, if you go far back enough, and you are of Scotch-Irish descent, you’ll find your roots in Scotland.

But like I said to the guy, Scotland is not better than Northern Ireland or vice versa. The English aren’t better than the Irish or the Scottish. Come on, this is the 21st century.

Back to figuring out an NPE. Where could this break have come into the line?

So I decided to start with William Ralston born about 1755 somewhere and who suddenly appears in 1769 in Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania. I am not sure who his father was. Or his wife. The published sources on the Ralstons, such as The Golden Threads and the other Ralston book have a lot of inaccurate information because they found a Ralston with that name in a locality (ignored the other ones in other nearby localities) and then blended the men together. There are at least three William Ralston’s in Western PA during the mid 1700s, so we cannot blend them together. Ralston was a common name.

I will start recording the results of this search in future blog posts.

But if you were notified of an NPE in your family DNA results, don’t let the project coordinators force upon you uneducated assumptions. These project coordinators should be held to the genealogical standards of sourcing, using primary and secondary credible documents, and of relaying information within the historical context of your ancestor’s life. It is okay to make an educated and informed best guess, after you have largely ruled out the other options.

And Northern Ireland is stunningly beautiful. On the Antrim coast you can see Scottish islands and practically swim across. You can at least take a boat.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
The Antrim coast in Northern Ireland with a view to Scotland.

Not my Benjamin Ellison of Birkenshaw/Burnsall, Yorkshire

There are several Benjamin Ellison’s from the same ancient parish of Birstall in Yorkshire all born between 1781 and 1786. On Ancestry.com these men are being rolled into one man.

I myself made the mistake of thinking Frances Rebecca Ellison born 1814 and baptized at St Peter’s in Birstall was the daughter of my Benjamin Ellison but what made me realize the error was that my Benjamin Ellison was a currier, and never a woolstapler. Frances Rebecca’s father Benjamin was a woolstapler. I began trying to figure out who was this other Benjamin and Mary Ellison in Birstall, Yorkshire.

Benjamin Ellison (not my Benjamin!) was born in March 1784 in Cleckheaton (of the Birstall Parish) to John Ellison and Hannah Wilkinson. He had a sister named Sally born 1785 in Cleckheaton and also a brother named Edward born 1788. Sally married Richard Dixson and these two were the signed witnesses to Benjamin’s marriage to Mary Beaumont at St Martin in the Fields, Middlesex, England on 28 DEC 1809. This is why it is important to read the original documents yourself; they often give clues.

Mary Beaumont was the (well-off) daughter of Benjamin and Rebecca Beaumont. She and Benjamin had three children: Francis Beaumont Ellison (1810-1898), Frances Rebecca Ellison (1814-1889 and never married), and George Ellison (1819-1896). All of whom were well-off because of their mother’s estate.

Then Benjamin did a bad bad thing. He left Mary and his family in about 1843 and went to Penzance, Cornwall, England and was living with Mrs. Elizabeth Ruth Seamon. And in 1845, he murdered Mrs. Seamon. He was executed for this crime on 11 AUG 1845 in Cornwall and you can read the entire story here:

http://freepages.rootsweb.com/~wbritonad/genealogy/cornwall/1845/misc/aug.html

In the story, his son George is mentioned and it is stated he was from Birkenshaw. Birkenshaw is essentially the same area as Cleckheaton.

I have a couple more Benjamin Ellison’s to try and figure out as I am not certain of the parents of MY Benjamin Ellison who married Mary Maria Ambler in Baildon, Yorkshire and died in Burnsall in 1832. Benjamin and Mary Maria had my Walker Ellison, whose grave I just visited in Baildon. He named his son Benjamin Walker Ellison, following the naming tradition.

I am using the British naming tradition as a clue and so far, Benjamin and Mary Maria did follow this tradition, which means that Benjamin’s father was William Ellison. Unless William was not their firstborn son. They named their firstborn daughter after the maternal grandmother: Hannah Maria Margaret Ellison. And their second son, if William was the first, after the maternal grandfather John Ambler. More research to be done.

benj_ellison

BENJAMIN ELLISON The above portrait of Benjamin Ellison, the murderer of Mrs. Seaman, of Penzance, is considered to be a good likeness, especially the upper part of the face and head; it was taken in the County Hall, Bodmin, while the unhappy criminal was receiving sentence of death for his awful crime. Ellison was a tall man, nearly six feet high, yet rather slightly formed. His aged was 61, and he was a native of Birkenshaw near Leeds, in the West Riding of Yorkshire. He had received a superior education, and had moved in a respectable station in life, having been connected with the manufacturing interest of his native county. We understand that his wife and family are still living, to deplore his untimely and disgraceful end. About two years since, he left his wife and home, in consequence of disagreements about pecuniary matters, and had not been heard of by her or his relatives until after his committal for the murder. The wretched culprit suffered for his crime on Monday last, and a full and authentic account of the execution is given in our fourth page. [The description of his death has been omitted; however, the confession is printed in full. He acknowledged in a letter that Elizabeth Bramble, whose testimony he adamantly denied at the trial, did substantially tell the truth. Ellison’s two sons visited him, but his wife did not – nor did any other relative. Evidently, he had no money of his own, so the will he signed bequeathing property to Mrs. Seaman was “purely a fabrication”; his wife was “possessed of considerable property”. jm]

 

 

 

Darius & Abigail (Paddock) Townsend Research in Dutchess and Putnam Counties, New York 1790-1800

I have recently discovered that Abigail’s line can be directly traced to Robert Paddock, the blacksmith of Plymouth Colony, Massachussetts. It appears he arrived to the colony circa 1634. Abigail’s line is Abigail~Nathaniel~Silas~Zachariah~Zachariah~Zachariah~Robert. There is a fabulous document titled “The Paddock Genealogy” and can be found on ancestry.com. Beware though, the entire book was not scanned in properly and information on Silas is on the missing pages. Original data: Curfman, Robert Joseph,. The Paddock genealogy : descendants of Robert Paddock of Plymouth Colony, blacksmith and constable, 1646. Fort Collins, Colo.: Curfman, 1986.

Online searches with zero results for Darius and Abigail:

General History of Dutchess County 1609-1876 by Philip H. Smith

History of Dutchess County by James Smith (1882)

Inscriptions from 5 NY, Dutchess County, Cemeteries

Putnam County Cemetery Inscriptions by Josephine Frost

Commemorative Biographical Record of Counties Dutchess and Putnam

History of Putnam County: Southeast section. Pages 287 and 289 list the Cranes and Paddocks as principal settlers of South East. Abigail’s mother was Mary Crane.

The History of Putnam County by William Blake

At the Archives of Michigan I searched the following books, microfiche, and microfilm for Darius and Abigail’s name and any possible children born/died in the years of the unknown children of this couple. Nothing much was found.

Index to Old Gravestones of Dutchess County, NY and then read through the acutal book: Old Gravestones of Dutchess County, New York

Marriages and Deaths 1778-1825 Volume 4 by Reynolds

Old Gravestones of Putname County with info from Dutchess by Barbara Buys

Historical and Genealogical Record, Dutchess and Putnam microform

Records of Early Settlers Putnam County, births microfilm

Cemetery Inscriptions Putnam County, including Fredericksburg microfilm

Confiscated Properies of Philipse Highland Patent lists Darius’s father Christopher Townsend as buyer for 122$ 2 JUN 1783 Fredericksburgh and also as the current occupier of the land. South East is located in the Philipse Patent. See map:

img_5045

Tax List of Philipse Patent, 1777 lists Christopher Townsend and Silas Paddock.

Old Southeast Church Cemetery book

Payments to People Who Built the Erie Canal F127.E5 K46 2008. Lists Townsend and Trenor as being paid $1000.00 to deliver cast iron culverts and other castings on line of Champlain Canal. This data was transcribed from a book: Laws of the State of NY in Relation to the Erie and Champlain Canals and the book is at the Erie Canal Museum.

Darius and Abigail have on censuses 6 unknown children. Two boys born between 1795 and 1799 in South East when it was considered Dutchess County and who lived with them in Windham, Greene County, NY 1801 to 1810 and then disappear. Four girls. Two born 1795 to 1800 and who both live with them in Windham. One girl born between 1801 and 1810 in Windham and who live with them through to Cayuga County 1830 census. One girl who lives with them on the 1830 census, and may be a grandchild. The known children are: William, Christopher, Elizabeth E., and Nathaniel Paddock Townsend.

I did find a possible lead: Nancy Townsend Noxon, wife of Daniel L. b. 1794, Feb 24th and d. 1865, May 1 buried in the Methodist Ground, Potter’s Corners, LaGrange, NY. Townsends were Baptists so this is a long shot.

 

 

 

Carroll and Ferrigan Family Home in Leitrim, County Down, Northern Ireland

Bridget Carroll Butler and her older brother Patrick were born in this Ferrigan Family home in Leitrim, County Down, Northern Ireland to John and Mary (Ferrigan) Carroll.

CarrollHomeinLeitrim

CarrollHomeinLeitrimTwo

Back of the photo below reads (written to Bridget Carroll Butler): “The same crowd taken outside of your old house at the Sheephill.”

CarrollHomeinLeitrimThree

Now here is the house when my grandmother visited in the 1970s:

 

BridgetCarrollButlerLeitrimHome

A barn with a red door was attached to the back of this home. In the 1970s the barn was over 300 years old.

FerriganBarnLeitrim

FerriganBarnLeitrim2

Patrick Carroll’s sheet in Grandma’s book. He was the son of John and Mary (Ferrigan) Carroll. Patrick met my great-grandmother Bridget when she landed in America at Castle Garden in New York on her own as a young woman.

img20180516_10330081

Here is Patrick F. Carroll, presumably with Catherine Kelley, his wife.

img20180516_10384256

Patrick’s obituary. Mrs. William Buttes should read Mrs. William Butler :

img20180516_10421710

Marjorie Butler Ralston’s Carroll Genealogy Book

I will be scanning in all the pages of the Carroll Family of Counties Down & Armagh, Northern Ireland genealogy pages my grandmother Marjorie Butler Ralston wrote and compiled.

Just keep in mind that Grandma spelled the names of places and people often incorrectly. And sometimes, she confused the County Armagh with County Down. Leitrim is a village near Castlewellan in County Down.

Grandma'sGenBookPageOneGrandma'sGenBookPageTwo

Nathaniel P. Townsend Questions to Answer

Nathaniel P. Townsend Questions to Answer

Nathaniel was born circa 1814 in New York. I have as of yet, determined who his parents were, but am strongly leaning toward Darius and Abigail Townsend from Bolton, MA removed to Conquest, Cayuga County, New York. Darius died in 1834 in Conquest, but there are no probate records on his death.

Who were N.P. Townsend’s parents?

On 10 Feb 1839, N.P. married Betsey A Welch, the daughter of John Welch and Maria ‘Polly’ Court. They were married in Jordan, Onondaga County, New York by the Reverend William Eddy.

What church was William Eddy associated with?

In 1840, N.P. lived in Conquest, Cayuga County, New York with another male aged between 70 and 79 and two females: one is obviously his wife Betsey and one is under the age of five.

Who was the elderly male and the young girl?

NPT1840Census

In 1841, Betsey and N.P.’s only son, Darius, was born.

On 28 March 1848, Elizabeth E. Townsend was born to N.P. and Betsey.

Elizabeth’s Birth: http://www.newhorizonsgenealogicalservices.com/ny-birth-cayuga-cato.htm

On 11 April 1848, Betsey dies in Cato, Cayuga County, New York.

Betsey’s Death:  http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~springport/pictures107/47d.htm

On 31 July 1849, N.P. had a child with Mary Eliza Perkins. We can safely assume they were married by then. They didn’t name this child.

Unnamed Birth: http://www.newhorizonsgenealogicalservices.com/ny-birth-cayuga-cato.htm

What happened to this child? A child of the age to correspond with this birth date never appears again on any records.

Mary Eliza Perkins was the widow of Cyrus James Gleason of Cicero, Onondaga County, New York.

Mary had three known children with Gleason:

Sarah Elizabeth born in 1839.

Lodowiski Lovilla born in 1842.

Edson H. born in 1844.

In 1840, the Gleason family was comprised of two males, one between 10 and 14 and two females, one under age 5 (Sarah Elizabeth).

Gleason1840Census

Who was the young male in this household and what happened to him?

In 1850, N.P. and Mary were living in Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin. N.P. was a cooper by trade. Living with them were:

Sarah Elizabeth

Lodowiski

Edson

Darius

NPT1850Census

N.P. had given his infant daughter Elizabeth up to a couple named Samuel H and Amanda (Davis) Cutler, who were living in Elbridge, Onondaga County, New York on the 1850 Census with a young child, now named Mary Alice Cutler. There are no probate guardianship records to reflect this, as control remained with the father. He did not need to go to court to give his child away.

Mary Alice Cutler became Mary Alice Ellison, wife of Benjamin Walker Ellison.

There are lots of questions that come up with this story, aren’t there? Especially, when N.P. remarried so quickly and had more children.

Charles Nathaniel Townsend was born in 1851 to N.P. and Mary. Charles married Minerva Freelove Barden and they resided for some time in the state of Washington. Charles was living in Lamoni, Decatur, Iowa in 1925.

Where/when did Charles die?

Adonirum Elnathan Townsend was born 2 April 1854 to N.P. and Mary. Adonirum married Josephine Hannah Shafer in Iowa. They moved to Washtenaw County, Michigan and Adonirum died in Ypsilanti, Michigan in 1904.

In 1855 N.P. was on the Wisconsin State Census in Wauwatosa Township, Milwaukee County.

On 2 April 1857 N.P. buys 80 acres of land in Waupaca County, Wisconsin.

NPTLand

Eliza Jennie Townsend was born June 1860 to N.P. and Mary. She first married Charles Marsh then Riley Isaac Glazier in Ashton, Osceola County, Iowa in 1889. She died in 1926 in Sibley, Osceola County, Iowa.

On the 1860 US Census, N.P. was living in Farmington, Waupaca County, WI with:

Mary

Darius, 19

Charles, 9

Adonirum, 5

Edson, 17

Lodawiski, 19

Eliza J., one month

NPT1860Census

On 10 June 1861, Darius joined Company B, 5th Wisconsin Infantry.

In the summer of 1862, Darius disappeared. Military records conflict. He was listed as discharged due to disability after being left in Williamsburg, VA after the Battle of Williamsburg in May 1862 then listed as being a deserter in August of 1862.

N.P. told the Federal Government on a pension application that Darius was reported to him as having been killed at the Battle of Antietam in September of 1862.

Darius disappears entirely from historical/genealogical records in 1862.

With the help of Archivists, I am working on this mystery.

Can you shed any light?

On 6 August 1861, Edson joined Company A, 8th Wisconsin Infantry. He also served in the 1st Wisconsin Heavy Artillery. Edson survived the war.

On the 1870 US Census, N.P. lived in Farmington still with:

Mary

Adonirum, 15

Eliza J., 9

NPT1870Census

In 1875, N.P. was listed in Appleton, Outagamie County, on the Wisconsin State Census. He was living with one other male and two females.

NPT1875WICensus

On the 1880 US Census, NP was 66 years old and living in Grand Chute, Outagamie, Wisconsin as a farmer. Only Mary lived with him at this time.

NPT1880Census

On 4 Jan 1888, Mary Eliza died in Ashton, Osceola County, Iowa.

What happened to N.P.?

I searched the microfilm death records of Osceola County, Iowa between the years 1880 and 1941. Only the record for Mary can be located.

I don’t think N.P. died in Osceola County, Iowa.

Any help anyone can offer me in answering the above questions would be greatly appreciated!

John Ralston Jr and Joseph Elrod

John Ralston Jr and Joseph Elrod were written about in Ruby Ralston’s book The Search for Our Ralston Ancestors.

According to Ralston, John Ralston Jr. was a captain in the PA militia and knew Elrod from there. John also purchased land from Elrod and the land records were transcribed.

You can read theseRalston1 Ralston2 Ralston3 Ralston4 Ralston5 Ralston6 Ralston7 RalstonCoverPage pages by clicking on them.

Thank you to the Butler Area Public Library for sending these to me.

Mary Alice Ellison’s Biological Parents – Mystery Solved!!

Mary Alice Ellison was born 28 MAR 1848 in Cato, Cayuga County to Nathaniel P. Townsend and Betsey Welch.

Her birth name was Elizabeth (Betsey) Townsend. She had one brother at the time of her birth, Darius Townsend. Darius served in the Civil War for the Wisconsin 5th Infantry. He was born circa 1841 in New York.

On 11 APR 1848, less than two weeks later, Elizabeth’s mother died.

The Cutler family and the Townsend family had many associations in Cayuga County and Onondaga County. They formed business relationships and they married each other.

Somehow, Samuel H Cutler and his wife Amanda Davis ended up with Elizabeth Townsend and they re-named her Mary Alice Cutler. Mary Alice is living with them in Elbridge, Onondaga County, New York in 1850. I have searched and searched the Surrogate Court records for this transaction and have not found it. Since, the father was alive at the time of the adoption, I don’t think they needed to go to court.

Nathaniel P. Townsend re-married very quickly to Mary Eliza Perkins (1849.) Mary Eliza was the widow of Cyrus James Gleason of Cicero, Onondaga County, New York. Cyrus and Mary had three children: Sarah Elizabeth (b.1839), Lodawiski Lovilla (1842-1922), and Edson H. (1844-1880). These children stayed with their mother and step-father and are listed on the censuses with them, sometimes as Townsend’s.

Nathaniel and Mary Eliza moved to Milwaukee, Wisconsin by 1850. They had four children together. One of them was born in Cato, New York on 31 JUL 1849 and is listed as unnamed. I have a feeling this child died. The other three children were: Charles Nathaniel (b. 1851), Adonirum Elnathan (1854-1904) and Jennie Eliza (1860-1926.) The Townsend family lived in Wisconsin for many years.

You have to be very careful when looking on ancestry.com about this family as people are listing the children with the wrong parents.

Nathaniel died sometime after 1880 (approx. 1894) in Ashton, Osceola County, Iowa where his daughter Jennie was living (Jennie Glazier.) There is a lot yet for me to learn about this Nathaniel P. Townsend- including who his parents were.

When Mary Alice died, her son listed her parents as being:

N.P. Townsend and B. A. Court

Which is partially true.

Her mother was Betsey A. Welch, the daughter of Maria Polly Court and John Welch. When Polly Welch died in 1863, she left her grandchildren Darius and Elizabeth (Betsey) Townsend some money. Maria Polly Court was the daughter of John Court and Lydia Wright of Cato, Cayuga County, New York. This mistake of using the Court name, as the mother’s maiden name, is actually the only reason I was able to figure this mystery out. A very good mistake indeed.

Below are a selection of the papers from Polly Welch’s estate file in Cayuga County, New York:

Welch2 Welch6 Welch12 Welch13 Welch14

 

 

 

 

Oscar Eastman Biography

Oscar Eastman was the son of Norman F Eastman and Cornelia Pratt. And the brother of my ancestor Charles L. Eastman, whose daughter Nellie Mae Eastman was my great-grandmother. Nellie Mae married William Alfred Ralston. My great-grandparents were originally from Jackson County, Iowa.

EASTMAN, OSCAR

Oscar Eastman, one of the earlier settlers of Lyon

county, and whose history is largely the story of the

settlement of that part of the county where he is

found to-day, located on section 32, Lyon township, in

1887. He was born in Jackson county, Iowa, July 28,

1862, a son of Norman and Cornelia (Pratt) Eastman,

natives of New York and Vermont. The father, who came

to Iowa in the very early days, was a life-long

farmer. When he died in 1893 he had reached the age of

seventy-six years. His wife, who died in 1884, lived

to be sixty-two years. They had a family of eleven

children.

Oscar Eastman was educated in the common schools, and

in his earlier manhood worked by the month at farm

work until his marriage, when he bought his present

place. He was married March 27, 1892, to Miss Minnie

Schoen, a resident at that time of Fairview, South

Dakota. Her parents, John and Mary Schoen, were

blessed with a family of ten children, of whom Mrs.

Eastman was the fourth in order of birth. To Mr. and

Mrs. Eastman have come the following children: Irvin

O., Chester N., Clarence and Agnes M., all of whom are

living and form a most charming family.

Mr. Eastman is becoming largely interested in stock,

and upon his place now has twenty-five head of cattle,

sixteen horses, and one hundred and fifty hogs. For

breeding purposes he has a stallion, Don Arno,

registered No. 25,-564, which is very highly regarded

in the neighborhood. Mr. Eastman is a member of the

Fairview Camp of Modern Woodmen of America, and

attends the Methodist church. He is one of the bright

and progressive young men of the neighborhood.

______________________________________________________

NOTE:  For more information on Lyon County, Iowa

Please visit the Lyon County, IAGenWeb page

at http://iagenweb.org/lyon/

______________________________________________________

Compendium of History Reminiscence and Biography of

Lyon County, Iowa. Published under the Auspices of the Pioneer

Association of Lyon County. Geo. Monlun, Pres.; Hon. E. C. Roach

Sec’y; and Col. F. M. Thompson, Historian. Geo. A. Ogle & CO.,

Published, Engravers and Book Manufacturers. Chicago, 1904-1905